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Welcome to 3D Printer Farms

Bringing manufacturing back to America through 3D Printing

For more than 60 years, American manufacturing dominated the world. Manufacturing jobs raised the lower working class into the middle class from 1900 – 2000. High-paying manufacturing jobs spurred a robust and growing economy, and we had little dependence on foreign nations for manufactured goods.

From 2000 to 2011, the U. S. lost 5,800,000 manufacturing jobs and 57,000 manufacturing firms closed down. This has caused slow economic growth, federal and state budget deficits, high unemployment, the shrinking of our middle-class, a decline in innovation and a decline in the proud “Made in America” attitude.

Today we need a national manufacturing strategy and well defined policies to rebuild American manufacturing.  At 3D Printer Farms, we will equip you with the tools and resources you need to participate in rebuilding American manufacturing and creating jobs at home. From a small desktop printer to a custom concrete printer capable of printing a house to a BAAM printer that can print cars, we have the right solutions to your manufacturing needs.

We are a dealer for multiple 3D printer manufacturers and also have access to many industrial and production 3D printers. Through years of building key relationships in the industry, we can provide information on almost all available additive manufacturing technologies and connect you with experts to get the right solution for your needs.

Some of our contacts include…

3D Systems

       


If you’re already familiar with 3D printing, check out our

online store here.  If not, we’ll start with a brief history below or you can check out our Frequently Asked Questions page.

Type A Machines Series 1

Type A Machines Series One Pro with 12″ x 12″ x 12″ print size
                       The Exiii Hackberry projectThe exiii Hackberry robotic arm with 53 parts 3D printed.
(www.exiii-hackberry.com)

A brief history of 3D printing

With all the articles, coverage and hype about 3D printing the past few years, you might think it’s a fairly new technology. Additive manufacturing, now known as 3D printing, is far from a new technology.

In 1981, Hideo Kodama of Nagoya Municipal Industrial Research Institute published his account of a functional rapid prototyping system using photo polymers. Charles (Chuck) Hull printed the first successful 3D print on March 9, 1983 (34 years ago) on this high tech printer called the SLA-1.

SLA1- the first 3D printerThe SLA-1 was created to speed up the lengthy time it took to have prototypes of products created. In the early 1980’s, it would take approximately 6-8 weeks using one-off tooling processes to make a prototype. (Sound familiar today?)  So a machine that could print a part in just hours was a major breakthrough in the manufacturing industry.

In 1986, Hull formed a company called 3D Systems, still a giant in the 3D printer world. In fact, the popular stl file format we use today was invented by Mr. Hull.

Why did 3D printing become so popular in the past few years?

The answer lies with several factors including the expiration of key patents, the open-source movement, the RepRap project launched in 2005 and the release of “Darwin” in 2008.  RepRap is humanity’s first general-purpose self-replicating manufacturing machine. Darwin was the first 3D printer capable of printing most of the parts to make a copy of itself. Today the RepRap project continues and many current printers are based on the same premise. This includes companies like Prusa, Lulzbot, Mendel, Printbot, Rostock and hundreds more.  You can join the movement at reprap.org

If you’re new to 3D printing, you’re probably thinking, “where do I start?”

Well, you have several options. You can spend hours and hours doing research, reading articles and reviews, asking friends, gathering opinions, meeting with salesmen and doing your own analyses. (Our FAQ section is good for this.) You can try to find 3D printers at local stores though this will greatly limit your choices. Or you can contact us for a brief discussion that will point you in the right direction based on your needs. We sell multiple lines of 3D printers but also act as consultants to assure you get the correct equipment for your needs. So even though we don’t sell metal printers, if that’s what you need, we have contacts at Concept Laser, EOS, 3D Systems, Markforged, ExOne, Desktop Metal and other metal printer manufacturers. If you need SLA, SLS, DLP, bio plotters or any other additive manufacturing solution, we can help you make the right decision.

Our toll-free number is 877-250-5445, my direct line is 214-725-6154 or you can use the email link or contact form below.

Artie Moskowitz, President

artie@3dprinterfarms.com